October 30th, 2008

What Does Search Activity Say About The Election?

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October 23rd, 2008

Estimated Click Fraud Rate Remains At 16%, Says Click Forensics

By Barry Schwartz

Click Forensics has released their estimated 3rd quarter click fraud numbers that they track. The numbers remain pretty much the same, at least as it pertains to the overall estimated industry average click fraud rate. The rate is now 16.0%, down from last quarter’s 16.2%.

The main change was that botnets were said to be responsible for 27.6 percent of the click fraud, up 10% from last quarter.

The average estimated click fraud rate of on the content networks, including Google AdSense and the Yahoo Publisher Network, was 27.1 percent, which is down from the 27.6 percent rate of the previous quarter. Click fraud was said to originate mostly from Russia (4.9 percent), France (4.8 percent) and the U.K. (3.5 percent) according to Click Forensics.

Via SEL>>>

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October 16th, 2008

Google & Microsoft Share Advice For Webmasters, SEOs

By Matt McGee

The ever-helpful teams writing for Google’s Webmaster Central blog and Microsoft Live Search’s Webmaster Center blog have published a variety of videos and presentations this week in the name of helping webmasters and search engine optimizers (SEO’s).

On the Live Search blog, Nathan Buggia recaps his SMX East presentation on Webmaster Guidelines, shares the slides from his talk, and expands on topics such as paid links, cloaking, and website penalties. He shares some detail on how Live Search handles paid links:

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October 9th, 2008

Yahoo Launches Web Analytics

By Matt McGee

Yahoo has announced that they’ll begin to roll out Yahoo Web Analytics (beta) on a limited basis beginning this week. According to Jitendra Kavathekar, Yahoo’s Web Analytics VP, the service has already been made available to select Yahoo advertisers and third-party application developers.

The next “big deployment,” Kavathekar says, will be for Yahoo’s 13,000 e-commerce customers hosting under the Yahoo Small Business service. Beyond that, Yahoo Web Analytics will continue to roll out for the rest of this year and into 2009.

Yahoo’s analytics service is a result of the company’s purchase of IndexTools earlier this year. Shortly after the purchase, Yahoo’s Dennis Mortensen announced the company’s plans to make Yahoo Web Analytics free.3

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October 2nd, 2008

Who Coined The Term SEO?

By Bob Heyman

Someone’s trying to trademark the term SEO, which has roiled the SEO community. The someone is named Jason Gambert, and he has filed with the US Patent and Trademark Office, claiming to have coined the term “SEO” (for Search Engine Optimization). SEOMoz and others have moved to challenge Gambert’s claim. As the person (along with my partner Leland Harden), who actually did coin the term Search Engine Optimization back in 1995, I feel uniquely qualified to weigh in on the validity of Gambert’s claim.

Jason Gambert asserts that he was the first to use the term SEO, in a 2007 email. The actual origin of SEO happened this way, as recounted way back in 1997 in the book Net Results that Leland and I wrote with Rick Bruner. Here’s an excerpt from page 137:

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September 25th, 2008

Are you using Twitter yet?

By Ron Jones, Search Engine Watch
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If not, you may want to read how other educators are using Twitter as an education tool.

For those who are coming up to speed, Twitter lets you broadcast or microblog your messages (140 characters max) to a group of friends or other subscribers, who can receive them as text messages, called a “tweet,” to your subscribers and their mobile phones. Since almost everyone has a mobile phone now this makes Twitter more effective as a communication tool.

Twitter in Academia

David Parry, assistant professor of Emerging Media and Communications at the University of Texas at Dallas, was a little apprehensive at first to use social media in the classroom, but after reading an article by Clive Thompson at Wired, he decided to give it a shot.

After giving his students a Twitter assignment one semester, Parry was curious to see how his students would react. He was surprised to see how it helped communicate with his students. After using it more and more he found “that it was one of the better things he did with the class.” He then posted these tips for using Twitter in academia.

Some of the highlights were an increase of “class chatter” as the class started using Twitter to have conversations inside and outside of the class. It seemed to develop a sense of “classroom community” as students began to develop a sense of each other outside the classroom space. Other tips are:

- Instant feedback.

- Track a conference or seminar.

- Follow a professional or famous person.

- Public notepad.

- Writing assignments.

- Grammar.

- Maximizing the teachable moment.

More at SEW>>>

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September 18th, 2008

Google’s “Submit Your Content” Page Changes Into Content Central

By Danny Sullivan

In the old days, getting listed on Google just meant having a web site. These days, you can get in by selling products through a virtual store, by having a book, by having a small local business that’s listed in a yellow pages directory and many other ways. To help centralize submission and inclusion information, Google has updated its Submit Your Content page to make it more into what I’d call Content Central, a guide to the many ways of being listed. Google’s also launched an actual Content Central blog, to coincide with the update.

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September 11th, 2008

Domain Acquisition — How Much is Too Much?

By Mark Jackson

A company that’s redesigning its Web site recently called me to discuss the possibility of my firm assisting them with their SEO efforts. First, I congratulated them on being one of the few companies to consider SEO prior to re-launching their site (that’s the way it’s done, people!). Then we talked about their domain name.

This company was planning to move their site to a new domain because the old domain (and by “old,” I mean 10 years old) no longer represented the company. As many of us do, they typed in about 100 different domain names into GoDaddy’s search and eventually found an available domain name that was more in line with their core business.

One problem: their domain name choice was absolutely horrible. It had five keywords crammed together. It was confusing, hard to recall, and terrible for branding, SEO purposes, and any other measurement that you wanted to put to it.

But, the domain name only cost $9.99 per year. What a deal, right?

With a little searching, I discovered an unused domain name that was an exact match to their “most important keyword phrase,” was originally registered in the 1990s (good domain age), and had an overall clear history. However, it would cost $20,000.

Their reply probably won’t surprise you: “We can’t afford $20,000 for a domain name!”

“Are you sure?” I asked.

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September 4th, 2008

You Need More Than One Site Map

One Site Map
By: Justin Pinkus

Something as basic as your web site’s site map could have more of an effect on the success of your web site than you originally may have thought. So why is it that site maps are often taken lightly or overlooked altogether? Most graphic designers, webmasters and even Internet marketers don’t grasp the many uses and purposes for a site map. And the ones who do might only incorporate one version when there is a strong value to having multiple types for different “audiences.”

In this article I will be reviewing the benefits of incorporating a site map, its prime positioning and the different types that should be considered for optimal success.

So What Exactly is a Site Map?

The simple definition of a site map is a page that contains an organized listing of links to all pages within the web site. You will usually find links to these pages somewhere on the home page of a web site, and on more proactive sites, every page. Often site maps are found at the top right or bottom navigation links, away from the main components and natural site navigation, but still positioned in areas of high visitor focus, based on eye-tracking tests that have been performed by knowledgeable Internet marketers.

There are of course many ways to structure the site map itself, taking into consideration a company’s brand colors and the special look and feel of the site itself. Some may choose to list links alphabetically while others choose a category-based approach. While the design layout choice is insignificant, an organized and easy to read and follow site map structure is.

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August 28th, 2008

Are You Giving Your SEO Enough Information to Succeed?

By Aaron Wall

Three years ago Todd Malicoat published a blog post titled Balancing the Link Equation, which offered conditional tips about how to improve the link profile of a website. I think of that post nearly every time someone asks for SEO advice because the field has grown so complex that both yes and no are often mutually wrong answers. The correct answer to most SEO questions is “it depends” followed by a whole bunch of qualifications like brand size, site age, content quality, site size, and marketplace competition.

Via SEL >>>

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